Articles

Before the Bus Station

Sue Mowat describes the development of an area of central Dunfermline in her new article “Before The Bus Station” . Using some excellent large scale maps of the town she illustrates her research on the changing uses of the land where our Bus Station now stands and tells us of the people who once lived there.

Touch Bleachfields Dunfermline

In the next in his series on Dunfermline’s Industrial Past, George Beattie tells the history of another business in the town, which supported the Fife linen industry from the mid 1840’s until the 1940’s. “Touch Bleachfields” tells us about how the business operated from it’s site on Halbeath Road and about it’s owners and some of the people who worked there over the years.

Handsel Monday

As we approach the first Monday of a new year, it’s interesting to hear how this used to be the day of the main mid-winter celebration in Dunfermline. But after the calendar was changed in 1752, which date should be used? In “Auld Handsel Monday” Jean Barclay explains how this ancient celebration was celebrated and argued over until it was finally replaced by New Year’s Day and by Christmas Day.

Lilliehill Fire-Clay and Terra-Cotta Works

In Robert Lindsay and Co. George Beattie presents the next article in his series on Dunfermline’s Industrial Past. This series shows clearly how in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, Dunfermline, like many towns of a similar size, had manufacturing businesses of all types to support the local economy. The Lindsay business produced a wide range of ceramic products for builders, architects, gardeners, farmers and others. In addition the owners and managers, like Robert Lindsay, were often active in local politics and the community.

Walter Scott’s Abbey Haul

Many of you will have visited Abbotsford House near Melrose, extravagantly built and furnished by Sir Walter Scott. But did you know that much of the ancient wooden panelling was “salvaged” from the old Dunfermline Abbey Church, when the new church was opened in the 1820’s. In “Sir Walter Scott and his “Hawl” from Dunfermline Abbey“, Jean Barclay explains what happened.